They Refused To Wear Shoes: 5 Famous Barefoot Superstars

You don’t need shoes to become a celebrity or a sell out. Checkout these five famous luminaries who tread the streets in bare feet.

Codi Lundin

Cody Lundin Barefoot Guru & survival Expert
Codi Lundin barefoot aboriginal life skills teacher.

This hardcore savage co-hosted of Discovery Channel’s popular reality television series, Dual Survival until the hollywood hacks replaced Dave Canterberry (a shod, but awesome dude) with an ornery pile of spicy donkey crap named Joe Teti.

Despite leaving the show, Codi continues to share his valuable expertise at his Aboriginal Living Skills School in Prescott, Arizona. He focuses on working with Mother Nature, not against her. You can learn more about his particular approach to life and to survival from his delightfully illustrated book, 98.6 How to Keep Your Ass Alive!

Steve Jobs

Barefoot Steve Jobs
Steve Jobs Barefoot during his days at Reed College.

I almost didn’t include Steve Jobs because of his disgraceful ethics. That said, the man was not stupid and revolutionized the computer industry. When he was just a poor entitled, middle class white male, little Stevie Jobs shunned shoes. According to Walter Isaacson while Steve attended Reed College in Oregon he “went barefoot most of the time, wearing sandals when it snowed”. To his credit even after making it big, Steve didn’t ditch his partiality for the sanctity of his lower leg often shopping at the super market in his bare feet.

Abebe Bikila

Faster barefoot
Abede Bikila winning the 1960 Olympic marathon in Rome

Abebe was an Ethiopian double Olympic marathon champion. He set a world record when he won the marathon at the 1960 Summer Olympics in Rome running barefoot. I wrote a separate blog post about how a minimalist shoe company tried to steal this man’s amazing legacy.

Pheidippides

Phidippides
Phidippides delivering word of victory before giving up the ghost.

Philippides inspired the marathon and the Spartathon. He is credited with running from Marathon to Athens (150 miles) to deliver news of a military victory against the Persians at the Battle of Marathon. It took him only two days. The Spartathon is described as the world’s most grueling races, it runs over rough tracks and muddy paths, crosses vineyards and olive groves, climbs steep hillsides and, most challenging of all, takes the runners on the 1,200 meter ascent and descent of Mount Parthenio in the dead of night. The  ominous mountain is covered with jagged rocks and thorny bushes, on which it is said Pheidippides met the god Pan. There is still no pathway over the mountain that is swept by strong winds with temperatures as low as 4°C. Even the finest athletes hallucinate as they cover the final stages of this epic race that retraces the naked foot steps of Pheidippides the ancient Athenian herald*.

Uma Thurman

Movie star Uma Thurman barefoot
Uma Thurman barefoot Cannes festival 2015

She is a semi-main stream actor who was married to both Ethan Hawke and Gary Oldman for brief periods–you can’t get anymore Gen X than that!  In 2015, she ignored the requirement for women to wear heels at this Cannes Film Festival parading around barefoot instead.

*Pheidippides was a hemerodrome , which means “day-runner / professional courier”.

What Vibram 5 Fingers Did To This Olympic Champion Will Piss You Off

Vibram Rips Off Barefoot Olympic Champion's Family.
Vibram Rips Off Barefoot Olympic Champion’s Family.

It’s September 10, 1960 and Ethiopia’s Abebe Bikila, is leading the pack in the Olympic Marathon in Rome, Italy. Morocco’s Abdesian Rhadi is chasing closely behind, but Rhadi can’t catch the remarkably fast barefoot Ethopian, who finishes in about 2 hours, 15 minutes, taking the gold and shattering the Olympic marathon record by almost eight minutes.

Bikila wasn’t even supposed to race that hot day in September-he was a last minute addition to the Ethiopian team when their star runner got sick.

Despite Bikilia’s amazing victory, his story doesn’t end happily. In 1969 a terrible crash leaves him paralyzed; when asked about the accident, he says:

“Men of success meet with tragedy. It was the will of God that I won the Olympics, and it was the will of God that I met with my accident. I accepted those victories as I accept this tragedy.”

He dies of complications, just a few years later.

There is no doubt that Bikili is a champion in every way. He epitomizes determination and the runner’s spirit.  In 2010, on the heels of the barefoot running craze, Vibram Five Fingers decides to make the barefoot olympian the poster child for minimalist running, introducing the Bikili line of five finger running shoes, trademarking the Bikili name to protect their golden goose. There’s just one problem: Bikila’s family never gives Vibram permission to use Bikili’s name in any way shape or form. When the family discovers that Bikili’s name is being used without permission, they sue Vibram in U.S. District Court, seeking monetary damages.

Unfortunately, Judge Ronald Leighton dismisses the case, leaving the family out in the cold.  The lawyer for Bikili’s family writes, “The fact remains that Vibram has never asked the Bikila Family for permission, nor compensated them for using Abebe Bikila’s personality….We hope that the parties can ultimately resolve their differences and the Bikila family can continue to promote the legacy of Abebe Bikila.”

Is this really what Vibram wants to be remembered for? Stealing an olympic champion’s legacy.

Boring Marathon

Boring Marathon Oregon Barefoot
Barefoot runner Boring Oregon Marathon

It was a strenuous route and it was not designed for barefoot runners–photo shows the GOOD GROUND. In fact, I was the only one crazy enough to tackle the rugged roads in my 4mm Xero Shoes–known to everyone else as “flip flops.” My heart leapt when the first notes of the Star Spangled Banner drifted out. It was sung high school sophomore girl with braces. As soon as the song ended, the horn blasted. We started off at the Barlow High School Track, then ran on the scabrous, mountainous roads for about six miles until we reached Boring Oregon. Once we got to Boring, we ran for 7 or so miles on the lovely and thankfully mostly level and smoothly paved Spring Water Trail. We had to cross to two busy streets, luckily the volunteers were there pressing the buttons to get us safely across. Luckily, I only got caught at one light. And I wasn’t there very long.

The aid stations were great and the volunteers were all in top form handing out water or electrolytes and saying, “Looking good. Keep it up! You’ve got this!” I appreciated the encouragement immensely, especially  when facing the last set of grueling hills at mile 22. Despite the painful twitches and spasms firing through my quads and calves and sheer exhaustion, I carried on and achieved my goal of sub four hour marathon. I managed to come in 3rd for my age division, 6th for the men’s division, and 8th overall.

I will be back next year for sure (They’re adding a 50K ultra)!!!!

Huckleberry Half Marathon Barefoot

Barefoot Runner with Bigfoot Huckleberry Half Marathon Welches Oregon
Barefoot Runner with Bigfoot Huckleberry Half Marathon Welches Oregon

This morning (August 8th) I think I became the first person to run Huckleberry Half marathon in Welches Oregon with 4mm sandals. Whether I was the first person to run the event barefoot or not, I received an awesome Wooden Bigfoot Medal–it’s dangling around my neck in the photo and had a lot of fun.

What a great event! No one said anything about sandals until we hit the streets. Thankfully, a majority of the comments were positive.

Things people said to me as ran. “You’re a beast” (in a good way). “That guy’s wearing flip-flops.” “All the crazies are passing us!” (To which I replied, the key phrase is “PASSING!”) “Let’s catch the guy in flip-flips.” (His friend’s reply, “I’m trying, but I can’t.” And neither of them did. I dropped them on one of the many hills.)

Although scampering across the streets in barefoot sandals made me a celebrity, it also took its toll on my feet. After three miles, I discovered why no one else wore minimalist footwear: the Huckleberry Half is NOT a barefoot friendly route! The streets are  long slabs of jagged, gritty gravel.  The roads climb slowly then level for a short distance then fall again, then climb again, then climb some more, the result is a route that never takes its fangs from your legs. My quads and calves are still sizzling from the lactic acid and my tender feet and toes are battered from the ragged asphalt. It didn’t help that I hammered  my left heel on a rock the first mile. The 13.1 miles were a struggle. The run was much more challenging than I expected and my time was much slower than I anticipated. But it was well worth it.

The volunteers and other runners were fantastic. I‘ll be back next year, even it’s just for the novelty of having teenage cheerleaders swish their pom poms in the air as I cross the finish line. BTW, I ran it in 1 hour 40 minutes 56 seconds.

The twenty seventh day of marathon training

Got up at six and ran six miles at slow lumbering pace. My right foot was still a little tender from my weekend fifteen miler. Thankfully, my marathon training schedule has me running lightly this week, thank God.

Shaking my bones on day 22

I love the way the morning smells, especially when the a light drizzle wets the fresh pavement. This morning I tossed my bones across six miles of rain soaked concrete. For twenty five minutes, I ran at my “10k pace”. Since I don’t have a 10k pace, I guessed that my 10k pace would be somewhere in my anaerobic zone.  Therefore, I forced my heart to pump blood at 149 to 154 beats per minute. It took effort, but it was worth it. I set a six mile PR. Tomorrow I run again, but not as fast.

Boring Barefoot Marathon Training Day 20

I feel fantastic!!! Yesterday, I ran thirteen miles early in the morning and I felt great the entire day. I’m not even sore today. This marathon training program is amazing.  At some point, I’ll share my entire program in a post.

At any rate, today I went for a walk around the neighborhood and did Pilates. It’s a rest day.  I run intervals tomorrow. See you then.

Boring Barefoot Marathon Training Day 19

I should have more to say about my long runs. I ran thirteen lucky miles today. Each one was mostly joyous. I sipped some homemade energy drink and ate a PowerAid gel. The gel wasn’t tasty, but it worked. I’m well within in my target pace.

 

Boring Marathon Training Day 18

I spun the grey clay with my wet hands into a cylinder on the pottery wheel. It was perfect for a few seconds, then it collapsed because I held my fingers in one place too long. The clay responds to the slightest movement, especially when it’s wet.  It’s is brutally honest. As my instructor says, “It remembers everything.”

Today was a strength day. Tomorrow is my long run.

Barefoot Boring Marathon Training Day 17

I woke up feeling sad–about what I’m not sure. Even so, I forced myself out of bed this morning. It was nice to have a goal, even though the goal seemed more like a chore. The schedule is giving me some much needed discipline. After completing my morning rituals, I stepped outdoors with my heart rate monitor strapped to my chest and my GPS aimed at the heavens. Then I ran an easy 7 mile course, keeping my heart rate in my target zone (141). At the end of my run, I was surprised to discover a long sequence of 5s on GPS timer (55:55:55)–definitely NOT a speedy pace. The chain of fives must mean something. There were six of them. That feels slightly off, five fives would be more balanced. I’ll just have to run a little faster next time. But that’s not all concerning the number five. I found a five dollar bill on the curb by my car!!!! What’s up with number 5 today? The universe is telling me something.

Weird Running Time: 55:55:55

Weird Running Time: 55:55:55

By the way, I bought some raku clay for my ceramics class tomorrow. I also drove to Vancouver, WA in search of something that wasn’t there.

What does tomorrow hold?